“Canned hunting” seems akin to going fishing in a hatchery

bedff5af-a86e-4610-9082-0598c03d67cc.imgEditor’s note: I’m not a hunter, but I am a fisherman. This practice of “canned hunting” seems akin to fishing for trout in a hatchery — or worse. “Cubs are usually separated from their mothers early in their lives and kept for petting until they become a threat to tourists. Once they are fully grown they are hunted,” the Financial Times is reporting. Here’s the report:

“When Cecil, the world’s most famous lion, died — 40 agonising hours after a US dentist shot him — he was lucky enough to have spent 13 years roaming free in Zimbabwe,” the Financial Times is reporting.

“By contrast up to 6,000 lions in southern Africa are bred and raised in captivity — for the purpose of being hunted by wealthy tourists.

“The killing of Cecil by Walter Palmer, a Minnesota dentist who has gone into hiding after he provoked outrage around the globe, has shone a spotlight on big game hunting in southern Africa, an industry that Peter Knights, executive director of the US-based WildAid conservation charity, estimates is worth about $1bn a year.

“Cecil was allegedly illegally lured out of a game reserve in Zimbabwe. Two men face charges over his death, while Mr Palmer insists that he did not know he was breaking the law. Hunting is legal in parts of Zimbabwe, as well as in Mozambique, Namibia and Tanzania.

“There are about 200 farms in Zimbabwe whose main purpose is to breed lions for wealthy tourists to spend hundreds of thousands of dollars to shoot them. About 900 are killed in legal hunts each year, according to Pieter Potgieter, the chairman of the South African Predator Association.

“’The rest are kept for tourist purposes while some are exported, mostly to the Middle East and Asia,’ he says.

“The practice has become known as canned hunting. Cubs are usually separated from their mothers early in their lives and kept for petting until they become a threat to tourists. Once they are fully grown they are hunted.”

The rest of the article is here.

Author: jeffpelline

Jeff Pelline is a veteran editor and award-winning journalist - in print and online. He is publisher of Sierra FoodWineArt magazine and its website SierraCulture.com. Jeff covered business and technology for The San Francisco Chronicle for 12 years, and he was a founding editor and Editor of CNET News for eight years, among other positions. Jeff has a bachelor's degree from UC Berkeley and a master's from Northwestern University. His hobbies include sailing, swimming, and trout fishing in the Sierra.

3 thoughts on ““Canned hunting” seems akin to going fishing in a hatchery”

    1. Yes indeed and the NBC Nightly News acknowledged that rather than burying its head in the sand about the profound impact of social media (as our community newspaper does).

  1. Todd Juvinall, the former county supervisor and CABPRO founder, ought to rename his blog “You can’t fix stupid.” Here’s an example of an email thread on his “blog”:

    “AnonymousAugust 2, 2015 at 3:44 PM
    A Lion gets killed in Africa and the Lib’s go crazy and want to lynch the dentist. Another Police Officer killed by a dirt bag and it’s crickets from the Lib’s. So very predictable.

    “Reply
    Todd JuvinallAugust 2, 2015 at 5:41 PM
    America is sick of them. They will be sent packing.

    “Reply
    Anonymous August 2, 2015 at 6:40 PM
    About the lion. Turns out that lion wasn’t killed. Not hearing much about the mistake. Good thing the dentist didn’t get lynched. BMW

    “Reply
    Todd JuvinallAugust 2, 2015 at 7:13 PM
    Where did you hear that?

    “AnonymousAugust 2, 2015 at 9:08 PM
    It was Cecil the lions brother Jericho that turned up okay despite rumors he’d been killed too. BMW”

    Oops, “BMW.” As for the first comment, people “go crazy” because of human behavior (i.e., the dentist). The story is much bigger than “a lion gets killed in Africa.”

    Who are the people that comment on that blog?

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