The ‘cult’ of Lego bricks

A Lego cake
A Lego cake
We’re throwing a birthday party for our 6-year-old son this weekend.

His friends will come to the house and play some games, run around — and eat a home-made cake that looks like a big Lego brick.

Like many children his age, my son is a Lego fanatic. He builds some incredible Lego toys, ignoring instructions on the box.

Space ships and bionicles are among his favorites. He carries them around the house on a cookie sheet, so they don’t break into pieces.

I played with Legos as a child, but many of my son’s bricks are much smaller — small enough to get caught in the vacuum or for his puppy to try to eat.

Legos also has a Web site with interactive games and videos, which my son has bookmarked on my Mac. He’s a much bigger fan of Legoland than Disneyland.

Adults are hooked on Legos too. A U.S. national model builder competition for adults occurs annually. Some adult works of art are shown the blog WebUrbanist.com.

Last year, Lego celebrated its 50th-anniversary, and I expect they will be around for the next generation of children.

Like iPods, a cottage industry could spring up for accessories: A “Lego catcher” that you install on a vacuum, for example.

(My son’s birthday flower bouquet behind the Lego cake comes from Foothill Flowers in Grass Valley. We’re big fans of their “works of art” for a special occasion and Mrs. Johnson’s holiday decorations. It epitomizes what a small-town merchant is all about.)

Author: jeffpelline

Jeff Pelline is a veteran editor and award-winning journalist - in print and online. He is publisher of Sierra FoodWineArt magazine and its website SierraCulture.com. Jeff covered business and technology for The San Francisco Chronicle for 12 years, and he was a founding editor and Editor of CNET News for eight years, among other positions. Jeff has a bachelor's degree from UC Berkeley and a master's from Northwestern University. His hobbies include sailing, swimming, and trout fishing in the Sierra.

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